Unvaccinated Pets

What are disease risks for dogs?

 

Find out what the risk factors are for dogs, depending on their overall health, age, lifestyle and environment. This chart shows how all dogs can be at risk for infectious diseases. Disease prevention through vaccination is generally safer than risk of infection.

Disease risks for dogs
SITUATION RISK FACTORS DISEASE AGENT
Dog stays at home and doesn't go out except in the backyard An infected dog gets into yard or makes contact through fence Any infectious canine disease*.
  Children in home visit the cute new shelter puppy next door and bring disease agents back to house on shoes or clothing. Common puppy diseases, such as distemper, parvo and coronavirus.
  You live in a home surrounded by woods and brush and/or live in an endemic Lyme disease area. Lyme disease**.
  Yard is surrounded by wildlife and wildlife are in your yard frequently where they can transmit disease. Leptospirosis; Lyme disease.
Puppy Puppies are particularly susceptible because their immune systems haven’t fully developed. Any infectious puppy or adult canine disease.
Geriatric dog Older dogs may have weakened immune systems and be susceptible. Any infectious canine disease.
Dog is boarded, goes to groomers or day care High level of interaction with other dogs. Facilities may require vaccination records, but total compliance is difficult to track and an unvaccinated dog may unknowingly be admitted. Kennel cough and/or any other infectious canine disease.
Dog goes on walks and steps in puddles or drinks from a pond At risk for lepto, especially if the disease is common in your area. Leptospirosis and/or any other infectious canine disease.
Dog goes to dog parks High level of interaction with dogs you don't know. Any infectious canine disease.
Dog is lost Dog gets out of backyard. Dog gets loose in a natural disaster such as hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes and fires. Infectious canine diseases if he is around other dogs or sheltered until he is found.
*Canine distemper, canine parvovirus (parvo), canine adenovirus (Type I), canine parainfluenza and adenovirus (Type 2), canine coronavirus, rabies, Kennel Cough, canine leptospirosis, canine Lyme disease **Canine Lyme disease is not passed from dog to dog but from the deer tick.


What are disease risks for cats?

 

Find out what the risk factors are for cats, depending on their overall health, age, lifestyle and environment. This chart shows how all cats can be at risk for infectious diseases. Disease prevention through vaccination is usually safer than risk of infection.

Disease risks for cats
SITUATION RISK FACTORS DISEASE AGENT
Cat is an indoor cat and never goes outside Very difficult to make sure the cat never gets outside where outdoor cats could be roaming. Introduction of a new pet into the home. Children in home visit the cute new shelter kittens next door and bring disease agents back to house on shoes or clothing. Any infectious feline disease*. Common kitten diseases and any infectious feline disease.
Cat is an indoor/outdoor or strictly outdoor cat Cat is in constant contact with other outdoor cats. Cat prowls into wildlife areas. Any infectious feline disease. Rabies or any other feline disease.
Kitten Kittens are particularly susceptible because their immune systems haven't fully developed. Any infectious feline disease.
Geriatric cat Older cats may have weakened immune systems and be susceptible. Any infectious feline disease.
Cat is boarded or goes to a groomer High level of interaction with other cats. Facilities may require vaccination records, but total compliance is difficult to track and an unvaccinated cat may unknowingly be admitted. Respiratory disease and many other infectious feline diseases.
Cat is lost Cat gets outside or wanders off outside. Cat gets loose in a natural disaster such as hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes and fires. Infectious feline diseases if he is around other cats or sheltered until he is found.
*Feline distemper, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline herpes virus (FHV), feline calicivirus (FCV), feline chamydiosis, rabies.

WATCH A CLIP

Richard Goldstein, DVM talks about why it's so important to vaccinate cats.